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Posts Tagged ‘Travel

Travel Writing at Hill Center

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Hill Center near Eastern Market on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC is sponsoring a   Travel Writing and Blogging class July 24, 2012, 6 to 9 pm.    Register now for this creative adventure.

Travel stickers when the going was great!

Hill Center partners with The Writer’s Center  in Bethesda, Maryland to recruit instructors for Hill Center’s writing classes.

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Written by patwa

06/07/2012 at 4:49 pm

Posted in Travel, Writing

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Hitchhiker’s Guide to Earth

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I recently learned about a project initiated by Everett Pompeii — a college student currently in Japan.

Hitchhiker’s Guide to Earth

Here are his words:
 “The more people you inspire to get out there, the better off the world is (in my view, anyway). Before we get too far, a bit about me. I’m a college student from the US, but I’m studying abroad in Japan.
On the way here, I backpacked and hitchhiked through most of Australia, New Zealand, and the East Coast of the US. I’m currently working on a how-to manual specifically for travelers like me; it’s called The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Earth.  The project is on a crowd-sourcing website called Kickstarter, and it runs until June 29, 2012
7:00 PM EST.”
Everett asked me for advice and a blog post might help spread word about his project.  Does he know I have about 20 different blogs? Check out his travel blog to learn more about this enterprising nomad’s paths.

Written by patwa

13/06/2012 at 5:55 pm

Melbourne in the State of Victoria

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Through countryside that resembles eastern Oregon or northern California without the mountains, I rode the CountryLink train South, South West from Sydney to Melbourne, an all-day ride.  Only sour moment was receiving a packet of imitation espresso powder and a cup of hot water when I expected brewed coffee at least.

After 10 days in Sydney, which felt like the world testosterone capitol, I’m chipper to be in laid back Melbourne where the air is sweet and art spaces outnumber rugby pitches.

Sydney ferries offered entertainment and respite.  The Parramatta river tides caused that long route to turn around at Rydalmere where passengers headed to the end of the line completed their trip by bus. Even through the days of rain and grey skies, I boarded a Rivercat or ferry every day, as passage is included in the weekly transport pass.  The return from Manly to Sydney at night provided a neon lit, nearly full moon arrival at Circular Quay, the primary ferry dock.

Melbourne is a major port city too, and I’ll be boarding the Spirit of Tasmania on 12 February for passage to the island that captured my imagination when I was age 6 or 7 and just starting to collect stamps.

In Melbourne, I spent most of my first morning at the Old Treasury Building, an elegant Italianate building where all the gold was once vaulted.  Exhibits featured local history, the founding of Melbourne, jailhouse photographs of late 19th c. Chinese miscreants and audio renditions of commentaries by the rough and tumble gold miners.   Today I’m at the State Library and will soon look at some old maps of Tasmania.  Art museums and archives have surprising collections.

I’m currently in the State Library’s chess room (with tables set up for play) using the free wi-fi which my hotel offers for hire.  See: Vintage 1975 images of Queen’s Hall and Chess Room.

Friday, I’m headed down the Mornington Peninsula where new friends have offered to drive me around to see a bit of the south coast.  They are an Aussie couple about my age who emigrated from So. Africa and run a real estate  promotion business here.  We met last night on the Southbank River promenade as we watched the passing scene and sipped wine.  They had gallantly protected my Greek salad from scavenger birds while I returned to the food court to fetch a glass of a bright, dry  Semillon Chardonnay blend.

Written by patwa

07/02/2012 at 2:14 am

My Geographical Life

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People often ask me about my travels and experiences in remote places.  My travels are indeed varied —  driving in an ancient Citroen across North Africa, camping out in scrubland or near the sea; climbing volcanos in Sumatra, Lombok, and the Moluccas; trekking in New Zealand; kayaking on Lake Biwa, Japan; and rafting and hiking in Kamchatka.

It all started with a passion for maps.  

Some of those adventures became travel articles or were anthologized in travel books.  One solo journey is recorded in detail in my book Pyrenees Pilgrimage, published in 2010.

I walked across France alone through the Pyrenees Mts. and foothills from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea, a difficult and strengthening experience. I’ve planned other cross-country walking journeys which I plan to do in the coming years.

During the 1970s, I wandered North America extensively on multiple cross country trips by car, train, bus and occasionally, thumb. During one marathon drive, my siblings and father covered more than 9,000 miles in  less than 10 days.  We must have been driving night and day. I lived briefly in Missoula, MT, and for much longer periods in Santa Cruz, CA, San Francisco, CA and St. Petersburg, FL.  During the 1970s and 1980s, I spent time in every lower 48 U.S. state and camped in National or State Parks in many of the central, southern and western states. I also visited Mexico and travelled across Canada by land a couple of times.

It wasn’t until 1992 that I visited Hawai’i and I’ve returned several times. Moloki’i and Big Island are my favorites, and Kaua’i is perfect.  In 1993 I traveled along the southern area of Alaska, by sea on the state-run inland passage ferry on my way to Anchorage.  On that trip, I was headed for a month- long stay on Kamchatka across the Bering Sea.  That was when Alaska Airlines ran regular flights from Anchorage to the Russian Far East.

Other places I visited during the pre Reagan years include Sardinia, Sicily and Elba.  With my companion, I traveled by bus or train and camped out on beaches or occasionally stayed in pensions or with friends.  We traveled through Costa Rica for 2 months in the winter of 1982 and I visited   South West France many times.

After I  started working for the Washington Post and began writing travel articles for the paper and other periodicals (and later on, websites),  my travel ramped up because a few short trips were at the invitation of foreign governments (such as Yugoslavia before their civil wars) or occasionally, I would have an assignment that included travel expenses paid by magazines.

Though most people assume the bulk of my travel costs were paid for by the Washington Post, that was never the case. I worked for the Post Travel section in a freelance capacity.  Freelance writers know that magazines and newspapers usually don’t cover travel expenses.

I arranged my own long adventures with unpaid leaves of absence from work for long Asian trips during the 1980s and 1990s.  Just as I had saved for my first solo trip in 1966, I habitually worked at two or  three jobs  to support my thirst for travel.  I explored Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asian on a trek with an outfitter in 1998, rather than going solo.

In all, I’ve spent time in more than 90 countries.  I’ve lived (had an address, cooked my own meals, my own library cards and/or driving permits) in China, France, Mexico, Canada and Italy.  During the years when I was living in Mexico and China, I was an employee of the US government.  I paid for my travel within those countries.

In sum, the travel writer’s lifestyle requires economic prudence and that usually means the writer needs a job.  Writing contracts that include travel expenses are infrequent.  When the urge to travel is strong, a resourceful individual will find a way.

 

Written by patwa

30/07/2011 at 7:51 pm

Tradecraft of a Travel Writer

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This was fun to write! I shared trade secrets about travel writing in the May-June 2011 issue of Writer’s Digest Magazine.   Explain that turquoise facade on the building in the background? Location?

Written by patwa

01/06/2011 at 6:01 pm

Riff on Silence

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Train on my way to Savannah, Gee A.  Mix of people new to train travel and old timers who know the routines. Pervasive rings of mobile phones display the only creativity modern AmeriCan-Bandana allows: What is your ring-tone?

While most want to fill the space with sound, the rest of us are struggling to empty the sound from our space.

What is the next killer app people asked, back in the 1990s after Netscape, after Red Hat, after Af-Ta.  The next one will be the one that silences everything. I don’t mean replacing ambient noise with an iPod generated music mask.  My sound neutralizer is  a variation of Baby Quiet ®, the helmet that prevents your attention deficient youngster from bashing its brains out against the cement wall in the day care center that wasn’t your first choice but will do the job.

Silence is more than golden. More precious than diamonds and not easy to obtain. When what is most precious is gone, the restoration costs more in terms of energy and effort.

Will Bose ®, the quiet headphones company sponsor a competion to improve and expand silence?

I found this quote:  “Don’t speak unless you improve silence .” (Jesus Nebot) from this website Speaker Net News.

Written by patwa

15/04/2011 at 3:01 am

Soup from the Pyrenees Mountains…

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Pyrénées Pilgrimage    a travel adventure by L. Peat O’Neil

www.PyreneesWalks.com    http://peatwalk.blogspot.com

Sample recipe from the travel culinary adventure Pyrénées Pilgrimage available POD through Amazon.

Basque Country Soup from the Pyrénées Atlantiques Region

Garbure or potage is standard Basque fare, made every season. The ingredients change to what is locally in season. Fall, winter and early spring versions include root vegetables. Spring potage includes ripe fava beans.  A summer version contains green beans, tomatoes, and new potatoes. The soup base is ham, white beans, and cabbage. 

Potage  — Garbure

4 quarts water

2 cups dried white navy beans, soaked in water for 8 to 10 hours

1 bouquet garni

1 pound ham shank (omit for vegetarian version)

2 medium carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped

4 to 6 medium potatoes, peeled and chopped into 1 inch cubes

1 medium onion, coarsely chopped

1 small cabbage, cored, and sliced into short strips or 1 inch squares

3 leeks, thoroughly washed, trimmed, and coarsely chopped

4 red peppers, cored and sliced into julienne strips

1/2 cup garlic, minced

1 tablespoons sea salt or more to taste

1/2 teaspoon freshly-ground white pepper

Place 4 quarts water, the white beans, the bouquet garni, and the ham shank in a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan over high heat. Cover and bring to a boil. Simmer for 15 minutes. Add the carrots, onion, potatoes, cabbage, leeks, garlic, and red pepper. Season.  Return to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Add more water if necessary.  Taste and adjust seasoning.  Cook until the vegetables are soft but not mushy.  Remove the bouquet garni and ham shank. Discard the bouquet garni. Remove meat from shank and add to soup or serve separately.

Written by patwa

05/03/2007 at 6:10 pm

Posted in Cooking, Travel

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